Emergency department visits for drug-related suicide attempts rise over six year period

SAMHSA News Releaseemergency
Date: 8/7/2014 12:05 AM
Media Contact: SAMHSA Press Office
Telephone: 240-276-2130

Emergency department visits for drug related suicide attempts more than doubled from 2005 to 2011 among people aged 45 to 64

Two new reports highlight the rise in drug-related suicide attempt visits to hospital emergency departments especially among certain age groups. The reports by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) show that overall there was a 51 percent increase for these types of visits among people 12 and older -- from 151,477 visits in 2005 to 228,277 visits in 2011.
One report analyzed the increase in emergency department visits by age and found that the overall rise resulted from increases in visits by people aged 18 to 29 and people aged 45 to 64. Visits involving 18 to 29 year olds increased from 47,312 in 2005 to 75,068 -- a 58 percent increase. Visits involving people aged 45 to 64 increased from 28,802 in 2005 to 58,776 visits in 2011 -- a 104 percent increase. In 2011, these two age groups comprised approximately 60 percent of all drug-related emergency department visits involving suicide attempts.

The other SAMHSA report focused on the 45 to 64 age group, which had the largest increase in emergency department visits involving drug related suicide attempts, and characterized these visits. The report found that the majority (96 percent in 2011) of these visits involved the non-medical use of prescription drugs and over-the-counter-medications. In 2011, these drugs included anti-anxiety and insomnia medications (48 percent), pain relievers (29 percent) and antidepressants (22 percent).

Other substances involved in these drug-related suicide attempt emergency department visits during the same year included alcohol (39 percent) and illicit drugs (11 percent).

The report also found that these visits by patients aged 45 to 64 doubled for both men and women during this time period.

“Suicide continues to take lives without regard to age, income, education, social standing, race, or gender.” said SAMHSA Administrator, Pamela S. Hyde. “It is a growing risk in far too many segments of our society. We must all do everything we can to combat this preventable and needless loss of life and the devastation it inflicts upon friends, families and communities across our nation.”

SAMHSA’s Suicide Prevention Resource Center at http://www.sprc.org provides information on a wide range of suicide prevention programs and resources who are dealing with this issue can draw upon. SAMHSA’s National Suicide Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/ provides real time, toll free, confidential suicide prevention counseling services 24/7 all year round to people in immediate crisis, or who may know someone who they fear might be considering suicide.

Both SAMHSA reports are based on the combined findings of SAMHSA’s 2005 to 2011 Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) reports. DAWN is a public health surveillance that monitors drug-related hospital emergency department visits throughout the U.S.

For more information about SAMHSA please visit: http://www.samhsa.gov/
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is the agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services that leads public health efforts to advance the behavioral health of the nation. SAMHSA's mission is to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America's communities.

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Do not let Weed be your King.

King Weed

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House passes bill aimed at reducing prescription drug abuse

July 29, 2014, 03:12 pmhouse_of_representatives_seal_n11729
By Cristina Marcos

The House on Tuesday passed legislation by voice vote to establish enforcement standards for prescription drug abuse.

Specifically, the measure would amend the Controlled Substances Act to modify the definition of "imminent danger to the public health or safety" so that it applies to drugs that pose present or foreseeable health risks.

The bill would also allow prescription drug companies registered with the Drug Enforcement Administration to submit a "corrective action plan" before a drug is suspended.
Members of both parties said the legislation would help combat abuse of prescription drugs.

"By approving this legislation, we will be giving our nation's law enforcement additional tools while protecting our patients and securing our drug supply chain in a reasonable and common-sense way," said Rep. Joe Pitts (R-Pa.).

Rep. Tom Marino (R-Pa.), the bill's sponsor, said it would not hinder law-abiding companies.

"Any legitimate business involved in distributing or dispensing prescriptions welcomes appropriate oversight and regulation," Marino said.

The legislation would also require the Department of Health and Human Services to provide Congress with a report on the collaboration between enforcement agencies.

Democrats agreed that it would strengthen the prescription drug supply chain and federal enforcement of drug laws.

"This bill would help prevent prescription drug abuse, establish clear and consist enforcement stands, and ensure patients have access to needed medications," said Rep. Frank Pallone (D-N.J.).

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Do Dope. Lose Hope.

Do Dope Lose Hope

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You Use. You Lose.

You Use You Lose

“Right is right even if no one is doing it; wrong is wrong even if everyone is doing it.”

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Interesting information about E-Cigarettes

The “Dark” Truth Behind E-Cigarettes [Infographic]

 

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New Pictures of Cornerstone Grounds

SONY DSC SONY DSC SONY DSC SONY DSC SONY DSC

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Brief Interventions Inadequate for Problem Drug Use

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Although brief interventions in primary care can make a difference for patients with risky alcohol use, similar approaches are ineffective for patients with problem drug use, according to a pair of studies published in this month’s JAMA. 

"Brief counseling can work for a lot of things, but we found no evidence to support the widespread implementation of universal screening and brief intervention for illicit drug use or prescription drug misuse," said Richard Saitz, MD, a researcher at Boston University School of Public Health and School of Medicine. 

"In retrospect, drug use is a complicated problem. While there might have been some hope that something as simple as this would work, it now appears it doesn't." 

In the first study, researchers randomly assigned 868 patients who admitted to problematic drug use at seven primary care sites deemed “safety-net” clinics in Washington State to either enhanced care as usual (a handout and list of substance abuse resources) or a brief intervention (a handout and list, as well as provider feedback on the patient’s drug use screening results, motivational interviewing, and an attempted 10-minuted telephone booster within two weeks of the visit). 

During 12 months of follow-up, researchers found no significant difference in drug use between patients who received care as usual and patients who received a brief intervention. Furthermore, the two groups showed no significant difference in secondary outcomes, which included hospital admissions, arrests, and death. 

In the second study, researchers tested the effectiveness of two well-established brief interventions on 528 adults with unhealthy use of marijuana, cocaine, or opioids seeking primary care. A third of the study’s participants received a 10-minute structured interview intervention; another third underwent a 30-minute motivational interviewing intervention followed by a 20-minute session with counselors; and the remaining third received no intervention other than a standard list of substance abuse resources. 

Over six months of follow-up, researchers found no significant differences among the groups for drug use, drug-use consequences, healthcare utilization, and unsafe sex. 

Dr. Saitz, who led the second of the two studies, said the take-away message is not the ineffectiveness of drug screenings, rather, the insufficiency of one brief intervention to solve a patient’s drug problems.  

"The message is not that we don't want to address drugs in medical settings—in fact, I believe we must, just as we address other risk factors and health conditions," he said. "Instead, the message is that this approach is inadequate. We're going to need something more. As doctors, we're going to have to take more responsibility for this problem, the same way we take responsibility for other factors that impact health." 

—Jolynn Tumolo 

References

1. Roy-Byrne P, Bumgardner K, Krupski A, et al. Brief intervention for problem drug use in safety-net primary care settings: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA. 2014; 312:492-501.

2. Saitz R, Palfai RP, Cheng DM, et al. Screening and brief intervention for drug use in primary care: the ASPIRE randomized clinical trial. JAMA. 2014; 312:502-513.

3. Study examines effectiveness of brief intervention for problem drug use [press release]. EurekAlert!: Washington, DC; August 5, 2014.

4. Brief counseling for drug use doesn’t work, BU study finds [press release]. EurekAlert!: Washington, DC; August 5, 2014.

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Motivational Interviewing May Not Curb Drinking Among Young Adults

NEW YORK - Young people may not see meaningful benefits from a counseling approach designed to curb their alcohol use, according to a new analysis of previous research.

Teens and young adults who took part in so-called motivational interviewing targeted to their risky drinking behaviors ended up drinking less alcohol and drinking less often, but the differences were not meaningful, researchers found.

"These programs aren't working or aren't working as well as we thought they should and we as society, policymakers and practitioners need to think of what we can do instead," said David Foxcroft, the study's lead author, from Oxford Brookes University in the UK.

Counselors who practice motivational interviewing interact with their patients in a non-judgmental way to highlight the dangers of an activity in the hope of coaxing a person past their ambivalence about changing their behavior.

In a report released August 20 by The Cochrane Library, Foxcroft and his colleagues say motivational interviewing is a popular technique used to target excessive drinking among teens, but until now it has not been examined by the Cochrane Collaboration, an international organization that evaluates medical evidence.

For this review, the researchers pooled data from clinical trials of motivational interviewing targeted to drinking among young people between 15 and 26 years old and comparing the method to no counseling or to some other intervention or therapy.

Overall, they found 66 trials involving 17,901 people. Most were conducted on college campuses. The rest were in other settings such as youth prisons and centers.

Foxcroft said a typical person included in these trials would be a college student deemed to be at risk for alcohol abuse through behavior caught by campus officials or through some sort of screening tool or test.

Most participants attended one individual session with a counselor while the rest attended either group sessions or a mix of individual and group sessions.

The researchers found that after four months, those who went through the counseling reported drinking an average of about 12.2 alcoholic drinks per week, compared to about 13.7 drinks per week among people who didn't go through motivational interviewing.

Those who went through motivational interviewing also reported drinking an average 2.5 days during the week four months later, compared to about 2.7 days per week among those who didn't go through the counseling.

The counseling group also saw a slight decrease in their maximum blood alcohol levels, but the average blood alcohol level did not change. Risky behaviors like binge drinking or driving drunk did not change at all among the young counseling participants.

Although some of the differences were greater than could be attributed to chance, the size of the effects overall are too small "to be of relevance to policy or practice," the study authors conclude.

"This review challenges what has been previously thought or concluded in previous research on motivational interviewing," Foxcroft said.

While the study casts doubts on the effectiveness of the counseling, the researchers cannot say it doesn't work for certain subgroups of young adults or that it's not effective for older populations like the elderly, he added.

For example, the new study included many college students who went to counseling as punishment for drinking in college and who may not be ready to make a meaningful behavior change.

Dr. Ken Carpenter, clinical director of the Substance and Treatment Research Service at Columbia Psychiatry/NY State Psychiatric Institute in New York, said the study's findings are limited by the quality of the research and data included in the analysis.

"A lot of these studies say they do (motivational interviewing) but a lot of them don't show how well it's being done," said Carpenter, who has been a motivational interviewing trainer and practitioner for the past 10 years.

He said the new findings won't change how he practices other than to look for other ways to support his patients.

"Certainly we should think through learning the boundaries and that these brief interventions may not be as helpful as we hoped they would be," he said.

SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1uYnk2a

Cochrane Library 2014.

(c) Copyright Thomson Reuters 2014

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Oreo cookies as addictive as cocaine - to lab rats

220px-Vector_Oreo.svg

A group of students and a professor of neuroscience have discovered that Oreo cookies may be as addictive as cocaine or morphine - to lab rats at least.

Professor Joseph Schroeder and his students at Connecticut College were conducting research on the addictiveness of high-fat and high-sugar foods, and how, for instance, they may contribute to the obesityepidemic.

Prof. Schroeder says:

"Our research supports the theory that high-fat, high-sugar foods stimulate the brain in the same way that drugs do. It may explain why some people can't resist these foods despite the fact that they know they are bad for them."

One of the students, Jamie Honohan (who has since graduated with a BA in Behavioral Neuroscience), was particularly interested in human motivation and food, and how the obesity epidemic may be linked to the prevalence of high-fat, high-sugar foods in low-income neighborhoods. It was her idea to use Oreos, as she explains in a statement issued this week:

"We chose Oreos not only because they are America's favorite cookie, and highly palatable to rats, but also because products containing high amounts of fat and sugar are heavily marketed in communities with lower socioeconomic statuses."

The results of their study are being presented at the Society for Neuroscience conference that is taking place early November in San Diego, CA.

Measuring pleasurable effects

The study shows that for rats, the association between the pleasurable effects of eating Oreos and a specific environment were as strong as for cocaine or morphine and a specific environment.

Oreo biscuits
Oreo is the best selling cookie in the United States (source

For their study, the students gave Oreos to hungry rats on one side of a maze, and on the other side of the maze they gave them a "control" food, in this case, rice cakes (Prof. Schroeder comments that like humans, rats do not seem to relish rice cakes very much).

Then they gave the rats the option to go to either side of the maze (without the food present), and measured how long they spent on the side where they were typically fed with Oreos compared with the side they were fed with rice cakes.

The researchers then repeated the experiment with another group of rats. This time, instead of feeding them Oreos and rice cakes, they injected them with addictive drugs - such as cocaine and morphine - when they were on one side of the maze, or saline, when they were on the other side. (Prof. Schroeder is licensed to carry out this kind of experiment).

The results show that the rats "addicted" to Oreos spent as much time on the side where they had been conditioned with Oreos as the rats that had been conditioned with addictive drugs spent on the drugs side of their maze.

High-fat, high-sugar foods 'addictive'

Prof. Schroeder and one of the students, Lauren Cameron, furthered the research by measuring the expression of a protein called c-Fos in the pleasure center of the rats' brains.

"It basically tells us how many cells were turned on in a specific region of the brain in response to the drugs or Oreos," Prof. Schroeder explains.

They found Oreos stimulated many more neurons than cocaine or morphine. This is in line with the findings of the earlier behavioral experiments and supports the idea that the high-fat, high-sugar foods are addictive.

In 2011, a team from Yale University reported finding that food addiction and substance dependence have similar brain activity.

And finally, one interesting observation - it seems that just like humans, rats eat the middle of an Oreo first.

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