How do I know if I am addicted?

17 Feb

blog-knowifaddicted

If you can’t stop taking a drug even if you want to, or if the urge to use drugs is too strong to control, even if you know the drug is causing harm, you might be addicted. The NIDA has put together some questions to ask yourself:

  1. Do you think about drugs a lot?
  2. Did you ever try to stop or cut down on your drug usage but couldn’t?
  3. Have you ever thought you couldn’t fit in or have a good time without the use of drugs?
  4. Do you ever use drugs because you are upset or angry at other people?
  5. Have you ever used a drug without knowing what it was or what it would do to you?
  6. Have you ever taken one drug to get over the effects of another?
  7. Have you ever made mistakes at a job or at school because you were using drugs?
  8. Does the thought of running out of drugs really scare you?
  9. Have you ever stolen drugs or stolen to pay for drugs?
  10. Have you ever been arrested or in the hospital because of your drug use?
  11. Have you ever overdosed on drugs?
  12. Has using drugs hurt your relationships with other people?

If the answer to some or all of these questions is yes, you might have an addiction. People from all backgrounds can get an addiction. Addiction can happen at any age, but it usually starts when a person is young.  Read more HERE.

#addicted #drugtreatment #addictionhelp

After an Opioid Overdose patients still prescribed more medication

10 Feb

Blog-opiatesmoremeds

An alarming new study has shown that around 90% of patients who have had an opioid overdose on a prescribed medication are given more of the same medication by the same doctor even after the overdose. We at Cornerstone will advocate and hope for policy changes in the near future to help physicians in making informed decisions regarding the use and safety of the medications they prescribe.

Read the full article HERE.

 

High School Seniors more likely to smoke pot than cigarettes

19 Jan

blog-potnotcig

According to a recent survey by the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse, High School age seniors are now more likely to smoke marijuana than cigarettes. This is a concerning trend to us in the drug and alcohol treatment field as we see the overall perception of marijuana use change due to the now legal status in certain states as well as the reported medical uses of the drug. We at Cornerstone of Southern California believe that marijuana is detrimental to one’s health and cognitive function and over the past 31 years treating addicts we strongly believe it to be the precursor to further experimentation leading to addiction.

Read more here.

Opiod overdose death statistics 2015

12 Jan

Blog-Opiod

Legal drug causing more deaths than Heroin

Tragically, there have been more and more deaths attributed to legal pain medications in the last year than ever before in this country. Pain meds like Vicodin and Oxycontin, prescribed by doctors to patients for everything from a toothache to a broken bone, have been shown to increase the likelihood of future Heroin use and abuse in those who have taken them. Recent studies have shown that Heroin users have increased by close to 300,000 people in the last year while legal pain medication users are up even higher. To learn more read HERE.

VICE: Cannabis Grow Kits for Kids

22 Dec

blog-cannabisAt first glance the article (link below) was quite concerning to us given the name that was chosen for this service. After reading the article we could understand the actual message that this company’s creator was trying to convey; although we feel that they could and should have branded themselves more accurately as a tool for learning about Cannabis and its myriad uses besides being an abused drug. Click here to read Vice’s Article

October is “Talk About Your Medicines” Month

8 Oct

Talk About Your Medicines

Recent studies have shown that prescription medications have become the leading cause of addiction in the US. Opiates (vicodin, xanax, etc.) and stimulants have been shown to be the largest problems.

If you didn’t know, October is “Talk About Your Medicines” Month bringing into focus appropriate dosage and usage, storage, disposal and overall safety of prescribed medications.

To find out more click: http://www.talkaboutrx.org

11 Facts About Teens And Drug Use

29 Jul
  1. 11 FactsMore teens die from prescription drugs than heroin/cocaine combined.
  2. In 2013, more high school seniors regularly used marijuana than cigarettes as 22.7% smoked pot in the last month, compared to 16.3% who smoked cigarettes.
  3. 60% of seniors don’t see regular marijana use as harmful, but THC (the active ingredient in the drug that causes addiction) is nearly 5 times stronger than it was 20 years ago.
  4. 1/3 of teenagers who live in states with medical marijuana laws get their pot from other people’s prescriptions.
  5. The United States represents 5% of the world’s population and 75% of prescription drugs taken. 60% of teens who abuse prescription drugs get them free from friends and relatives.
  1. Adderall use (often prescribed to treat ADHD) has increased among high school seniors from 5.4% in 2009 to 7.5% this year.
  2. 54% of high school seniors do not think regular steroid use is harmful, the lowest number since 1980, when the National Institute on Drug Abuse started asking about perception on steroids.
  3. By the 8th grade, 28% of adolescents have consumed alcohol, 15% have smoked cigarettes, and 16.5% have used marijuana.
  4. Teens who consistently learn about the risks of drugs from their parents are up to 50% less likely to use drugs than those who don’t.
  5. 6.5% of high school seniors smoke pot daily, up from 5.1% five years ago. Meanwhile, less than 20% of 12th graders think occasional use is harmful, while less than 40% see regular use as harmful (lowest numbers since 1983).
  6. About 50% of high school seniors do not think it’s harmful to try crack or cocaine once or twice and 40% believe it’s not harmful to use heroin once or twice.

Sources:

https://www.dosomething.org/facts/11-facts-about-teens-and-drug-use

http://www.amazingandweird.com/facts/interesting-facts-about-drug-abuse-and-illegal-drugs-you-never-knew/

http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/drugs_some_facts?open

Teen dies, woman held in drug-ingestion incident

29 Dec

WEST CARTHAGE — State police are investigating the death of a 15-year-old boy at a friend’s residence at 4001 Deer River Road.

According to a news release, troopers arrested Brenda Roth, 47, of 4001 Deer River Road, on one count of second-degree manslaughter, five counts of endangering the welfare of a child and one count of tampering with evidence.

Ms. Roth is accused of failing to provide life-saving measures to the teenager when he became unresponsive after ingesting prescription and over-the-counter medicine at her residence, the release stated.

Ms. Roth was also charged with five counts of endangering the welfare of a child for allegedly allowing the drug to be used by five teenagers at the residence and one count of tampering with physical evidence items at her residence.

She was arraigned and remanded to the Lewis County jail, Lowville, on $20,000 cash bail or $40,000 bond.

The dead boy was a student at Carthage Central School. District Superintendent Peter J. Turner said Monday morning that, “school counselors will be available to provide support to students when they return” from the holiday break next Monday.

According to several Facebook pages, Carthage students were mourning the sudden loss of a freshman, Derek Holton.

State police were assisted in their investigation by the Lewis County Sheriff’s Office and the Lewis County District Attorney’s Office.

According to Times’s records, Ms. Roth was charged in February 2009 with 24 counts of unlawfully dealing with a child and seven counts of endangering the welfare of a child. Police charged her in connection with a gathering of young people in her home the night of Oct. 27, 2008, when she allegedly provided beer and marijuana to the visitors and allowed them to use the drugs. Included in the counts were allegations that she allowed a child to sell prescription drugs and permitted one of her children to miss more than 35 days of school, police said at the time of her arrest.

Disposition of those charges in Carthage Village Court was not immediately available.