Choose wisely!

16 Mar

Addiction recovery is a chance to begin again with a clean slate and a positive outlook! Once you have freed your mind and body of the shackles of addiction you can move forward in whichever way you may choose. It is all at once a liberating and, for some, a terrifying prospect. Fear is natural and should be a welcome emotion after years of smothering your true emotions in substance abuse. Feel something! Mold your new life to your will and always – take it one day at a time!

We at Cornerstone salute all of you Recovery Warriors! Fight on!

Can a morning routine change your life?

8 Dec

Most addiction treatment facilities place a strong emphasis on daily routines as a method of abstaining from drug use. If you were to ask any recovered individual who has a number of years under their belt you will find that most have a morning routine that they do not deviate from and which helps them to focus and prepare for each day before they leave the house.

Whether they are smiling at themselves in the bathroom mirror and reciting positive affirmations or taking ten minutes to meditate and focus on the tasks the day will bring them, they all find comfort and benefit greatly from their morning routines.

Yes, a morning routine can change your life.

To learn more about this small change that leads to massive results CLICK HERE.

When emotions become triggers what can you do?

16 Nov

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Most of us have heard of mindfulness and being ‘in the moment’ as ways to deal with stress and unbridled emotions. Not dwelling on the past or focusing solely on the future but being fully present in the here and now can be a beneficial mindset in dealing with life on a daily basis. It reduces feelings of anxiety and stress and relieves worry and consternation.

Our emotions are often the triggers that can lead us to relapse. How can we fight these emotional time bombs and come out victorious? CLICK HERE to find out.

California Governor Jerry Brown signs overdose law

30 Sep

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California Governor Jerry Brown has signed a new overdose law into effect which will increase naloxone access to pharmacies and individuals who need it. Pharmacists can now furnish this life-saving medication to an addict’s family members – those who may be in contact with someone at risk of an opiate overdose – or directly to the individual who is requesting it. The law will also require education and training for both the pharmacist and the consumer whenever this medication is distributed. To learn more – CLICK HERE.

Why do some people become addicted to drugs and not others?

8 Sep

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There is no single prerequisite or contributing factor that will signal if someone will become an addict. It takes a group of influencing factors working together (in most instances) to create the addicted person and the more of these prerequisites a person has the greater the chance that addiction becomes an issue for them.

A few examples of these contributing factors are:

  • The Individual’s Biology. Addiction is a disease and therefore the genes someone is born with will make up for about half of their possible predisposition to becoming an addict. Other factors include a person’s gender, ethnicity, and the possible presence of some form of mental disorder may also increase risk for drug use and addiction.
  • The Individual’s Environment. One’s environment can include a whole host of different influences, from a person’s family and friends to their economic status and general quality of life. Other contributors such as peer pressure, physical and sexual abuse, early exposure to drugs, stress, and lack of parental guidance can greatly affect a person’s likelihood of drug use and addiction.
  • The Individual’s Development. Genetic and environmental factors interact with critical developmental stages in a person’s life to affect addiction risk. Although taking drugs at any age can lead to addiction, the earlier that drug use begins, the more likely it will progress to addiction. This is particularly problematic for teens. Because areas in their brains that control decision-making, judgment, and self-control are still developing, teens may be especially prone to risky behaviors, including trying drugs.

These are only a few of the contributing factors that can lead to drug addiction. If you or a loved one need help with addiction call us today.

Letter from the Surgeon General Regarding the Opioid Epidemic

7 Sep

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Dear Colleague,

I am asking for your help to solve an urgent health crisis facing America: the opioid epidemic. Everywhere I travel, I see communities devastated by opioid overdoses. I meet families too ashamed to seek treatment for addiction. And I will never forget my own patient whose opioid use disorder began with a course of morphine after a routine procedure.

It is important to recognize that we arrived at this place on a path paved with good intentions. Nearly two decades ago, we were encouraged to be more aggressive about treating pain, often without enough training and support to do so safely. This coincided with heavy marketing of opioids to doctors. Many of us were even taught – incorrectly – that opioids are not addictive when prescribed for legitimate pain.

The results have been devastating. Since 1999, opioid overdose deaths have quadrupled and opioid prescriptions have increased markedly – almost enough for every adult in America to have a bottle of pills. Yet the amount of pain reported by Americans has not changed. Now, nearly 2 million people in America have a prescription opioid use disorder, contributing to increased heroin use and the spread of HIV and hepatitis C.

I know solving this problem will not be easy. We often struggle to balance reducing our patients’ pain with increasing their risk of opioid addiction. But, as clinicians, we have the unique power to help end this epidemic. As cynical as times may seem, the public still looks to our profession for hope during difficult moments. This is one of those times.

That is why I am asking you to pledge your commitment to turn the tide on the opioid crisis. Please take the pledge. Together, we will build a national movement of clinicians to do three things:

First, we will educate ourselves to treat pain safely and effectively. A good place to start is the TurnTheTideRx pocket guide with the CDC Opioid Prescribing Guideline. Second, we will screen our patients for opioid use disorder and provide or connect them with evidence-based treatment. Third, we can shape how the rest of the country sees addiction by talking about and treating it as a chronic illness, not a moral failing.

Years from now, I want us to look back and know that, in the face of a crisis that threatened our nation, it was our profession that stepped up and led the way. I know we can succeed because health care is more than an occupation to us. It is a calling rooted in empathy, science, and service to humanity. These values unite us. They remain our greatest strength.

Thank you for your leadership.

Vivek H. Murthy, M.D., M.B.A.

19th U.S. Surgeon General