5 Healthy Foods as Sweet as Candy

30 Sep

Untitled-3-Recovered (1)

5 Healthy Foods as Sweet as Candy

Frozen Banana Dipped in Chocolate

You want us to recommend ice cream…..we know, but we cannot do it with a clear conscience. If you have an unbearable craving for ice cream Cornerstone recommends a frozen banana dipped in melted dark chocolate. Bananas are high in potassium which lowers blood pressure and reduces the risk of strokes. This is the perfect substitute for an ice cream sundae.

Hot Cocoa

Who doesn’t like a hot cup of cocoa? The answer – no one! Cocoa is one healthy food that actually tastes good too. One tablespoon holds around 10 – 15 calories and close to 2 full grams of fiber. To reap the most rewards from cocoa it is best to purchase ‘all natural’ cocoa powder. Try to steer clear of cocoa that has been alkalized as this process can remove the beneficial nutrients along with the bitter taste cocoa usually has. Look out for terms on the label like ‘Dutch-processed’, ‘European-style’ or ‘alkali’ which should alert you to the processed ingredients within. Cornerstone recommends that you mix the natural cocoa with almond milk or soy milk to keep it healthy and tasting great!

Greek Yogurt with Fruit

Topping Greek yogurt with fruit makes a decadent and healthy dessert option. This snack not only will satisfy your hardcore sweet tooth but it will also provide your body with essential nutrients like fiber, protein and healthy fats. This is a great pre or post workout dessert.

Almonds Lightly Dusted with Cocoa Powder

Do you love Peanut M&Ms? How can you get the sweet satisfaction and nutty goodness without all the sugar? Cornerstone suggests  trying almonds with cocoa powder! Coming in at just around 150 calories, a quarter cup of roasted, unsalted almonds holds about 3 grams of fiber along with 6 grams of protein. Once they are covered in a light dusting of cocoa powder they become a tasty treat that is heart healthy and can lower LDL cholesterol.

 

Dark Chocolate

This decadent delight is an excellent healthy snack that has been shown to lower stress levels and reduce anxiety as well as control healthy blood pressure and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. According to a published study by the American Chemical Society it is best to consume chocolate that has at least 70% cocoa and to watch the amount that you eat. Eating around one ounce is just enough without going overboard and ingesting too many unneeded calories.

 

What to Do When Your Loved One Comes Home from Treatment

29 Sep

What to do copyWhat to Do When Your Loved One Comes Home from Drug Treatment

Monnaye, my Case Manager at Cornerstone of Southern California welcomed me into her office with a smile and a handshake that made me feel instantly comfortable and safe. A few minutes later we were giggling about something or other when a few thoughts occurred to me, “I am going home soon. How is that going to feel? How will my family deal with me if I start to fall off the path that I am so firmly on while here at Cornerstone?”

Monnaye, as usual had all the answers for me and I thought that these answers might be very useful to others out there in the same situation. Monnaye really knows her stuff and I think her responses to my questions will help you too.

 

Q: What do I expect when he/she returns home from Cornerstone? What can I do to be ready and helpful?

Monnaye: This is a big deal! Two things come to mind: “What to do when they come home” (or while they’re in treatment) and, “What not to do when he/she returns home.”

What To Do

  • The first thing the family members should do is to educate themselves on all aspects of addiction so they are aware of what may or may not happen. I recommend family members to read the book ‘Staying Sober’ by Terence T. Gorski. This book does an excellent job explaining what drug addiction is.
  • I also would recommend going to a few Al-Anon meetings— give them a try. The addict’s family need to understand what their part is in this recovery process, and they MUST understand they cannot fix or change their loved one. All they can do is learn and change themselves.
  • Families need to understand that they have to be patient and understanding with their newly recovered loved one. Addiction recovery is a process—not an event; so don’t expect a miracle of instant change.

What Not To Do

  • Try not to take things personally. Let  your loved one go to as many meetings as they feel they need, don’t give them a hard time about this as it is a very positive sign.
  • You must communicate, even if what you have to say is negative.
  • Don’t worry about being the cause of your loved one’s relapse, they can do that all on their own. You don’t have that much power over anyone. Be honest about your feelings. It’s “OK” not to know what to say; just don’t hold something in; it isn’t worth it.
  • Don’t keep secrets from them; shine a light on everything. Saying that you don’t understand or that you don’t know what to do is always better than saying nothing at all.

Q: Would you ever tell the family members to play a direct role in the rehab process of their loved one?

Monnaye: The best thing a family can do is to take care of themselves and their actions. When they realize that they are powerless over their loved one’s addiction, they’ve taken the first step towards helping. Many families do all they can to help, but they often end up enabling their loved one in the process.

It’s very important that families allow their loved one to hit “rock bottom”. Continually helping and enabling an addict lets them start to think, “I don’t have a problem. They keep coming in and saving me, so I don’t have to truly deal with these issues.”

Q: So enabling someone is like a teacher whispering answers to her student during a test?

Monnaye: Exactly right! It’s all about letting go. It sounds simple; but it’s never easy.

Q: When an addict comes home from treatment, what do you recommend they do?

Monnaye: It varies from client to client, but having a routine and keeping busy is key.

 

When clients are here at Cornerstone, they’re on a tight schedule, and that’s intentional from a treatment perspective. Up until this point, they haven’t been able to do that for themselves in their own lives. Maintaining some form of daily routine when they return home is equally important.

Q: Is there a specific structure or routine you recommend to clients when they leave Cornerstone?

Monnaye: We work with them intensively, one-on-one before they leave the treatment setting and develop an exit plan that we both agree upon..

Within this exit plan we identify “high risk” situations and prepare them to deal with the risks they’ll confront back home. For example, if someone knows they’ve always had a drink after work, that desire won’t necessarily go away after treatment, so we help them form a plan to deal with these “risks.”

Q: Is a majority of this plan helping them to identify the triggers of their addiction, not only here at Cornerstone, but when they return home too. Is teaching them how to deal with those triggers when they return home a big part of your job as a counselor?

Monnaye: Yes it is! At Cornerstone our Relapse Prevention Education teaches our clients all about triggers and high risk situations.Once they’ve identified their personal triggers, we sit down with them and decide what we’re going to do as each trigger rears it’s ugly head.

 

Q: I have always thought that families were the people who push addicts out the door and into rehab. Is that an accurate statement?

 

Monnaye: Sometimes families do send their loved one to treatment in an appropriate way, but often they push them when they’re not ready and the addict is resentful early in recovery.

Most of what we tell families is to give the addict room to recover. Certainly talk about the problem, but don’t try to micro manage it.

Families are not all knowing or infallible. They can’t tell their loved one what to do.

Often the family doesn’t realize that they themselves exhibit a behavior called codependency. For the most part, the addicts know they’ve messed their lives up, but the families don’t realize their

enabling behaviors have helped keep their loved one’s disease alive and thriving. This isn’t a cut and dry issue, as all families are different.

Testimonial – How Cornerstone saved my Son!

28 Sep

testimonials 1Testimonial – How Cornerstone saved my son

By Lynda K

 

My son just completed a treatment program at Cornerstone of Southern California.

I am very grateful for this program and its entire staff. I am saddened by some of the negative reviews I have read. I don’t think people who wrote those understand what isinvolved in getting someone you love the help they need.

Cornerstone is owned and run by Dr. Stone; a family physician  who specializes in addiction medicine. His family now helps to run the day to day operations, they are not profit driven, they are driven to help people, unlike many other treatment centers that are being run by large corporations and have investors.  If you want a non-profit treatment center, there are many available.

My son was very sick before being admitted to Cornerstone. One of his friends called me and said he was worried and something needed to be done ASAP or my son would be dead in 3 days. Needless to say, I panicked as I was not aware his drinking had become that bad.

I was able to get him admitted to Cornerstone right away and Sam and Mary the admissions staff were compassionate and understanding. Within a short time they had him in a detox bed and were getting his labs done. His blood pressure was sky high andhis liver enzymes were triple what they should have been. He is doing much better now as we caught this just in time.

Irma was his first counselor in detox. She was tough, but it was just what he needed. She takes no BS!

His counselor Linda was also perfect for him. She was balanced with just the right amounts of firmness and love.

Alcoholics and Addicts can’t be coddled. They will always walk all over the staff and continue to manipulate everyone. Cornerstone knows this and they offer some tough love. Yes, my son got angry and wanted to leave at times. He thought the staff was being unfair. It was when he was not getting his own way. The staff are not pushovers like me, his mother.

I would absolutely recommend Cornerstone to any friend or family member. They have every level of program to fit your needs. They are licensed by the State of California, accredited by JCAHO (similar to hospitals). They hired amazing staff, have beautiful facilities that cost money to operate at this level. In comparison to other Southern California and National treatment centers, that I have checked, the detox, residential and outpatient are very moderately priced. They did their best to work with my insurance company.

I am very grateful to everyone there. Thanks to you all, my son is sober and happy today.

Which Drug is Your State Most Addicted To?

25 Sep

What drugs are abused in your state?

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In recent years the Obama administration has spent over $10 billion dollars on expanding the access to drug treatment and drug education across the nation. The White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) has reported a disturbing rise in prescription drug abuse while the CDC has classified the trend as an epidemic.

 

We here at Cornerstone have been helping addicts for 31 years in Southern California and have seen first hand the trending increase in the number of prescription drug abusers over the past few years. We have also noticed that the age range of these addicts has dropped significantly. We are regularly seeing late teen and early 20 year olds who have become addicted to prescription medications.

 

We came across a very interesting article that shows the drug abuse problems broken down by state. Take a look HERE and find out what drugs are most abused in your home state.

 

Image Credit: Fiona Breslin

 

New England’s heroin problem may be one of the biggest public health issues of the past few years. Vermont is the epicenter of the explosion in heroin addiction in New England. The state has seen an increase of more than 250% in people receiving heroin treatment since 2000. The greatest percentage increase, nearly 40%, occurred this past year. In 2013, there were twice as many federal indictments against heroin dealers than in the previous two years, and over five times as many as had been obtained in 2010. And last year, Vermont had nearly twice the number of deaths from heroin overdose as it did the prior year.

 

While the a public health crisis stemming from heroin overdoses has been building for years, Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin finally brought the subject to national attention in January after focusing his entire State of the State address to the region’s heroin crisis. In June, the governors from five New England states facing a heroin crisis they call of “epidemic proportions” met to devise a regional strategy to combat the rise in overdoses and deaths from opioid abuse.

Scores of towns and cities across New England, indeed across the country, have reported record numbers of overdoses and deaths. The governors agreed to share data on painkiller prescriptions and devise treatment agreements among their state Medicaid programs. “We’re saying the sky’s the limit,” Gov. Shumlin told the New York Times. “Let’s treat it like the public health crisis it is.”

Below, you’ll find a breakdown of addiction by state:

– Alabama: Marijuana is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in Alabama, followed by cocaine and other opiates including prescription drugs.

– Alaska: In 2010, marijuana is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in the state, followed by other opiates including prescription drugs.

– Arizona: The rate of drug-induced deaths in Arizona is higher than the national average. Between 2007 and 2008, Arizona was among the top 10 states for the rate of use of drugs other than marijuana among young adults aged 18 to 25.

– Arkansas: Marijuana, followed by stimulants (including methamphetamine) is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in Arkansas.

– California: 36% percent of voluntary admissions were for stimulants (including methamphetamine) while only 25% were for marijuana.  

– Colorado: Marijuana is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in Colorado.

– Connecticut: Connecticut is one of the top 10 states for dependence on illicit drugs among young adults ages 18 to 25. Heroin is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions.

– Delaware: “Other opiates,” primarily prescription drugs, are the most commonly cited drugs among primary drug treatment admissions in the state, followed closely by marijuana and heroin.

– Florida: Marijuana is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in Florida, followed by other opiates (including prescription drugs).

– Georgia: The data show that cocaine is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in Georgia.

– Hawaii: Marijuana is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in Hawaii, followed closely by stimulants (including methamphetamine).

– Idaho: Marijuana is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in the state. Nearly 50% of primary drug treatment admissions in Idaho were for marijuana.

– Illinois: Heroin is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in the state.

– Indiana: Marijuana is the most commonly cited drug in Indiana.

– Iowa: Marijuana, followed by stimulants (including methamphetamine), is the most commonly cited drug.

– Kansas: Marijuana is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in the state, followed by stimulants.

– Kentucky: Opiates, including prescription drugs, are the most commonly cited drugs among primary drug treatment admissions in Kentucky.

– Louisiana: Marijuana is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in the state, followed by cocaine.

– Maine: Opiates, including prescription drugs, are the most commonly cited drugs among primary drug treatment admissions in the state. Marijuana is a far second behind.  

– Maryland: Heroin is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in Maryland.

– Massachusetts: Heroin is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in the state. Marijuana comes in at a distant fourth after opiates and cocaine.

– Michigan: Marijuana, followed by heroin, is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in the state.

– Minnesota: Marijuana is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in the state, and it leads pretty far ahead of other drugs.

– Mississippi: Marijuana is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in the state. The large prevalence of “other/unknown” treatment admissions indicates these data are not currently being reported by certain providers.

– Missouri: Marijuana, followed by stimulants (including methamphetamine), is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in the state.

– Montana: Marijuana, followed by opiates, is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in the state.

– Nebraska: Stimulants, including methamphetamine, are the most commonly cited drugs among primary drug treatment admissions in the state, followed closely by marijuana.

– Nevada: Stimulants, including methamphetamine, are the most commonly cited drugs among primary drug treatment admissions in Nevada.

– New Hampshire: Opiates (including prescription drugs) are the most commonly cited drugs among primary drug treatment admissions in the state, followed by heroin and marijuana.

– New Jersey: Heroin is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in the state. Marijuana trailed fairly far behind.

– New Mexico: Data not available, but at a glance, in 2007-2008, New Mexico ranked first among all states for illicit drug dependence among persons age 12 and older. The drug-induced death rate in New Mexico is significantly higher than the national average. Approximately 9% of New Mexico residents reported past-month use of illicit drugs; the national average was 8%.

– New York: Heroin, followed by marijuana then cocaine, is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in the state.

– North Carolina: Marijuana, followed by cocaine, is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in the state.

– North Dakota: Marijuana is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in the state. Aside from opiates and stimulants, the use of other drugs is almost negligent.

– Ohio: Marijuana is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in Ohio, followed by heroin.

– Oklahoma: Marijuana is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in the state, followed by stimulants (including methamphetamine) following closely behind.

– Oregon: The data show marijuana is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in the state.

– Pennsylvania: Heroin is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in the state, followed by marijuana.

– Rhode Island: Heroin is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in the state, followed by marijuana.

– South Carolina: Marijuana is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in South Carolina, surpassing primary treatment admissions for stimulants (including methampetamine) and other opiates (including many prescription drugs).

– South Dakota: Marijuana is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in South Dakota, followed by stimulants (including methamphetamine) and other opiates (including prescription drugs).

– Tennessee: Opiates, primarily prescription drugs, are the most commonly cited drugs among primary drug treatment admissions in the state.

– Texas: Marijuana is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in the state, followed by cocaine, then heroin.

– Utah: Stimulants (including methamphetamine), followed by marijuana and heroin, are the most commonly cited drugs among primary drug treatment admissions in Utah.


Vermont: Opiates, including prescription drugs, are the most commonly cited drugs among primary drug treatment admissions in the state, followed by marijuana.

– Virginia: Marijuana is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in the state.

– Washington: Marijuana, followed by stimulants (including methamphetamine), is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in the state.

– Washington, D.C.: Heroin and cocaine/crack are the most commonly cited drugs among primary drug treatment admissions in the District of Columbia, each separately counting as 32% of all treatment admissions in 2011.

– West Virginia: The data show that opiates, including prescription drugs, are the most commonly cited drugs among primary drug treatment admissions in the state.

– Wisconsin: Marijuana is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in Wisconsin, followed by cocaine.

– Wyoming: Marijuana is the most commonly cited drug among primary drug treatment admissions in the state, followed by stimulants (including methamphetamine) and other opiates (including prescription drugs).

Is Synthetic Marijuana safe?

8 Sep

 

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Synthetic Marijuana, also called K2, Spice, Green Giant, Yucatan Fire, Skunk and Fake Weed is an unregulated herbal mixture sold  as potpourri, created by spraying psychoactive chemical additives over dried plant material. Although this packaged product is labelled ‘not for human consumption’ it is widely smoked as an alternative to organic ‘real’ marijuana. This product, when smoked or ingested, creates mind altering effects (elevated mood, a feeling of relaxation, altered perception, paranoia, anxiety and hallucinations).

Until recently, these products were sold legally in gas stations and head shops across the U.S. but the DEA has now listed the 5 most common synthetic cannabinoids found within them as Schedule I controlled substances, making them illegal to buy, sell or purchase. The manufacturers of these synthetic cannabinoids continually change the chemicals they use in an attempt to escape the new legal restrictions which, in turn, create an ever changing product with no set standards on quality or composition.

One might ask, “Why does anyone use these substances and not just regular marijuana?” The ease of purchase, the labeling as ‘natural’ and the fact that the synthetic chemicals used have not (until recently) been easily detectable using normal drug testing methods have led to their high popularity especially among male, high-school age children. The national numbers from 2012 of illicit drug use by high school kids are troubling; Marijuana 36.4%, Synthetic Marijuana 11.3%, Hallucinogens 4.8%, Salvia 4.4% and MDMA 3.8%.

At this point in time there have not been any studies of how these synthetic cannabinoids effect the brain. We do know that they interact with the same receptors as THC and due to their chemical composition may be much more powerful and unpredictable in their actual effects. Over the past few years users who have been taken to Poison Control Centers and ERs have symptoms ranging from vomiting, nausea, confusion, agitation, rapid pulse and breathing as well as vivid hallucinations. There have been reported heart attacks induced by consumption of synthetic marijuana as well as elevated blood pressure.

So far, there have been no scientific studies of Spice’s effects on the human brain, but we do know that the cannabinoid compounds found in Spice products act on the same cell receptors as THC, the primary psychoactive component of marijuana. Some of the compounds found in Spice, however, bind more strongly to those receptors, which could lead to a much more powerful and unpredictable effects. Because the chemical composition of many products sold as Spice is unknown, it is likely that some varieties also contain substances that could cause dramatically different effects than the user might expect.

Although it is still unclear how bad these substances are for us the initial results of use seen in this country should cause alarm in the public health arena.

 

Anti-Craving Medications – REAL or FAKE?

2 Sep

Anti-Craving MedsThere are many differing ideas on how to best help addicts obtain and maintain sobriety from drugs and alcohol. There is even a father and son combo out there who say that if you read their book you will be cured of all your addictions! This is some really amazing, groundbreaking stuff (and if you believe it I have a bridge to sell you).

So, are there any REAL Anti-Craving Medications or therapies out there that truly help addicts stay clean? The REAL answer is – YES, yes there are!

Cornerstone of Southern California has been helping addicts to get clean for 31 years focusing on RELAPSE PREVENTION and was the one of the first treatment centers to begin using anti-addiction/craving medications even when the rest of the treatment community were still up in arms over new medications like suboxone and naltrexone (Revia, Vivitrol). The addiction treatment community saw these medications in a very negative light and felt that in using these medications a treatment provider was, in effect, giving drugs to their clients.

Since these dark days in the drug treatment world these legitimate anti-addiction/craving medications have become the standard in the field and more and more treatment seekers are admitting into programs like Cornerstone of Southern California that can provide these medications to ease the painful symptoms of detoxification off of drugs and alcohol, reduce the time spent in Detox (the most expensive level of care in residential drug treatment) and even to curb the cravings for drugs and alcohol when they rear their ugly heads.

 

Click here to read all about the different anti-craving medications!

Cornerstone Health Tips!

28 Aug

CS Health Tip

NUT BUTTER PACKETS

On-the-go single-serving packets of nut butters such as almond, hazelnut, or peanut are excellent portion-controlled snacks rich in good fats, minerals and protein. Try and consume the brands with the least amount of added sugar and remember not to eat anything that touts itself as “reduced-fat” as these brands simply replace the good, healthy, natural fats with sugar.

 

 

 

 

 

IN-SHELL PISTACHIOS

Pistachios have high protein content, cholesterol-reducing monounsaturated fat, and tons of fiber and energy-boosting B vitamins. Sounds good right! They’re so delicious that it’s easy to eat several handfuls which can quickly put your calorie count in the red.. One ounce contains roughly about 160 calories. Why do we call for in-shell pistachios? Scientists at Eastern Illinois University have discovered that the time spent shelling pistachios made people consume an average of 41 percent fewer calories overall, than when the nuts were already shelled.

 

NEED TO KNOW:

When pistachios are added to carbohydrate-rich meals, they can significantly reduce the after meal blood sugar spike.

 

MIXED NUTS

Nuts like peanuts, cashews, and almonds make for a crunchy way to add more protein and healthy unsaturated fats to your diet. They pack about 6 grams of protein per 2-ounce serving.

NEED TO KNOW:

You should watch your sodium intake! Buy “UNSALTED” packages!

 

WALNUTS

Walnuts contain omega-3 fatty acids which are fantastic for overall body and heart health with only around 4 grams of carbohydrates per ounce! Again you should choose the salt-free variety for optimal health.

NEED TO KNOW:

Walnuts also supply copper, which is needed for healthy energy production.

 

FROZEN GRAPES

When it gets hot outside a great way to stay true to your healthy diet and cool off at the same time are frozen grapes! They are sweet and delicious and will help to satisfy your sugar cravings in the best way possible without hitting the donuts or chocolate bars. The best way to freeze these cold sugar nuggets is to lay them out in a single layer in a zip-lock bag in your freezer until firm.

NEED TO KNOW:

Substitute red grapes now and then to reap the benefits of higher levels of antioxidants than what is contained in green grapes.

 

EDAMAME


These are essentially underripe soybeans but provide a beneficial blend of protein, good-for-you carbohydrates and just enough good fat to increase your energy output during your gym or fitness routine. Edamame are also full of nutrients like iron, magnesium, vitamin K and Folate.

NEED TO KNOW

Purchase edamame that is certified organic and limit your intake quantities as too much soy is not good for the body.

 

DRIED PLUMS

Need an energy boost before hitting the gym? Try dried plums, also known as prunes! These chewy dried fruits are excellent replacements for all the bad processed snacks that your brain craves when you get hungry. Studies have shown that dried plums create a high degree of satiety or fullness due to the fiber contained within.

James Neumann, CEO of Cornerstone of Southern California and ____ time marathon runner says, “If you want a healthy alternative to all the energy drinks and powders before a workout eat dried plums/prunes about a half an hour before hitting the gym.”

NEED TO KNOW

Dried plums/prunes are packed full of antioxidants that aid in repairing muscle tissue and combat disease.

 

CELERY

Oh that tasteless vegetable! Tasteless due to its 95% water content, but perfect for increasing your natural fluid intake and cutting bad carbs out of your diet. Celery tastes better with some peanut butter (or better yet almond butter) on top.

 

NEED TO KNOW

Celery is a great way to increase your intake of beneficial vitamin K which helps build strong bones and teeth.

 

APRICOTS

These tasty treats are another excellent bad-snack alternative. They contain a high dose of fiber and not too much sugar which is a great combination for the health conscious eater.

 

NEED TO KNOW


They are orange in color and contain large doses of beta-carotene which has been connected to better brain functioning in individuals who eat them.

 

 

STRAWBERRIES

In the realm of all berries, strawberries contain the least sugar, at around 11 grams per cup, making them another healthy alternative for quenching the desires of an unbridled sweet tooth. If you’re concerned about possible pesticide exposure, Look for organic strawberries to limit your exposure to harmful pesticides.

NEED TO KNOW

Strawberries are an excellent source of vitamin C.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20778689,00.html

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/26-best-healthy-snacks.html

http://www.cookinglight.com/eating-smart/smart-choices/healthy-office-snacks

 

People to Avoid on the Road to Recovery

27 Aug

On the Road to Recovery it’s best to avoid certain people

Triggers. People, places, situations, smells, music, past and future events; all can be triggers to the mind of drug addicts. These ‘things’ can cause anxiety and stress which leads people to feelings of anger, depression and grief which in turn lead even addicts in recovery to feel the intense pull of drugs and alcohol.

Quality substance abuse treatment facilities like Cornerstone of Southern California focus on relapse prevention and in identifying the triggers  which can lead to relapse. Cornerstone staff and Case Managers create a plan for each individual post discharge to minimize and deal with these triggers in an effective and controlled manner. One of the main causes for relapse after treatment for many clients are old friends and people who may make them want to use drugs. When an addict can identify those people from their past and either avoid them or minimize the contact that they have with them their chances at continued sobriety increase.

Dealers and Users

Obviously the first and most important group of ‘people to avoid’ are those individuals who either supplied the addict with drugs and/or used drugs with them in the past. It does not matter if these ‘people to avoid’ have stopped using drugs themselves or even swear that they will not offer drugs to the recovering addict ever again. These people will always bring back feelings and memories of using drugs and the constant, looming possibility of obtaining drugs from them at any time.

Old Using Friends

Any relationship that is based on getting high or using licit or illicit drugs is not healthy for  anyone involved. Even old using friends who are in recovery themselves can lead an individual back to drugs and alcohol. These friends in recovery relationships should be handled with care and built up slowly over time ensuring that both parties have a solid foundation in their personal recovery programs before spending too much time together.

Enablers

There are those who enable the  addictive behavior in their friend or loved one. This occurrs when someone:

  • Obtains alcohol or drugs for the addicted person
  • Gives the addicted person money or pays their bills. This behavior frees up the addict’s cash flow enabling them to pay for drugs
  • Helps the addicted individual in making excuses for time off work due to drug use or any other helpful lies which support drug use over responsible life choices
  • Helps to create boundaries around the addicted individual’s drug related actions and softening the consequences when they continue those negative behaviors

Most often, this ‘enabler’ is a family member, spouse/partner or a close relative, making it difficult to create a healthy space between individuals. At Cornerstone of Southern California our relapse education for the enabling person, and guidance from our certified addiction counselors with their years of addiction treatment and recovery experience, can help to repair these relationships.