Alcoholics Anonymous Twelve Steps:

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  1. We admitted we were powerless over alcohol-that our lives had become unmanageable.
  2. Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
  3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.
  4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
  5. Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
  6. Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
  7. Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.
  8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
  9. Made a direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
  10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
  11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.
  12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to others, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

Source: AA World Services Inc

A.A. At A Glance:
What is A.A.?

Alcoholics Anonymous is a voluntary, worldwide fellowship of men and women from all walks of life who meet together to attain and maintain sobriety. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking. There are no dues or fees for A.A. membership.

How A.A. Started
A.A. was started in 1935 by a New York stockbroker and an Ohio surgeon (both now deceased), who had been hopeless drunks. They founded A.A. in an effort to help others who suffered from the disease of alcoholism and to stay sober themselves. A.A. grew with the formation of autonomous groups, first in the United States and then around the world.

Current Membership
It is estimated that there are more than 100,000 groups and over 2,000,000 members in 150 countries.

How A.A. Is Supported
Over the years, Alcoholics Anonymous has affirmed and strengthened a tradition of being fully self-supporting and of neither seeking nor accepting contributions from nonmembers. Within the Fellowship, the amount that may be contributed by any individual member is limited to $2,000 a year.

How A.A. Members Maintain Sobriety
A.A. is a program of total abstinence. Members simply stay away from one drink, one day at a time. Sobriety is maintained through sharing experience, strength and hope at group meetings and through the suggested Twelve Steps for recovery from alcoholism.

Why Alcoholics Anonymous Is "Anonymous"
Anonymity is the spiritual foundation of A.A. It disciplines the Fellowship to govern itself by principles rather than personalities. We are a society of peers. We strive to make known our program of recovery, not individuals who participate in the program. Anonymity in the public media is assurance to all A.A's, especially to newcomers, that their A.A. membership will not be disclosed.

Anyone May Attend A.A. Open Meetings
Anyone may attend open meetings of A.A. These usually consist of talks by a leader and two or three speakers who share experience as it relates to their alcoholism and their recovery in A.A. Some meetings are held for the specific purpose of informing the nonalcoholic public about A.A. Doctors, members of the clergy, and public officials are invited. Closed discussion meetings are for alcoholics only.

Source: www.aa.org

Al-Anon & Alateen:
Millions of people are affected by the excessive drinking of someone close.

The following questions are designed to help you decide whether or not you need Al-Anon:

  1. Do you worry about how much someone else drinks?
  2. Do you have money problems because of someone else's drinking?
  3. Do you tell lies to cover up for someone else's drinking?
  4. Do you feel that if the drinker cared about you, he or she would stop drinking to please you?
  5. Do you blame the drinker's behavior on his or her companions?
  6. Are plans frequently upset or canceled or meals delayed because of the drinker?
  7. Do you make threats, such as, "If you don't stop drinking, I'll leave you"?
  8. Do you secretly try to smell the drinker's breath?
  9. Are you afraid to upset someone for fear it will set off a drinking bout?
  10. Have you been hurt or embarrassed by a drinker's behavior?
  11. Are holidays and gatherings spoiled because of drinking?
  12. Have you considered calling the police for help in fear of abuse?
  13. Do you search for hidden alcohol?
  14. Do you ever ride in a car with a driver who has been drinking?
  15. Have you refused social invitations out of fear or anxiety?
  16. Do you feel like a failure because you can't control the drinking?
  17. Do you think that if the drinker stopped drinking, your other problems would be solved?
  18. Do you ever threaten to hurt yourself to scare the drinker?
  19. Do you feel angry, confused, or depressed most of the time?
  20. Do you feel there is no one who understands your problems?

If you have answered yes to any of these questions, Al-Anon or Alateen may be able to help.

Contact:

Al-Anon Family Group Headquarters, Inc.
www.al-anon.alateen.org
wso@al-anon.org
1600 Corporate Landing Parkway
Virginia Beach, VA 23454-5617
Phone: (757) 563-1600
Fax: (757) 563-1655

Source: Al-Anon.Alateen.org.

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